Research

THE LINK BETWEEN HYPOTHYROIDISM, PUBERTY AND MELANOMA

Hypothyroidism can develop during puberty as part of the hormonal changes that occur during that time. Such was the case in Claire. She became fully symptomatic for hypothyroidism at the same time her mole started to change and became malignant. This study, from MD Anderson, found in some people hypothyroidism feeds the development of melanoma cells. Some moles can have high receptors to TSH, a hormone that develops in excess with hypothyroidism. Dr. Julie Ellerhorst, author of the research, tested Claire’s samples and found Claire “had a very high receptor to TSH”. She told me in her opinion as a researcher, hypothyroidism was connected to the development of melanoma in Claire.

http://erc.endocrinology-journals.org/content/13/4/1269.full

 

WOMEN, ESTROGEN AND MELANOMA

Yet another study indicates melanoma is not always about the sun. Scientists are now investigating why women under 50 are proving to be at greater risk for melanoma.

http://bit.ly/1wV7GUi

MELANOMA CAN APPEAR WHERE YOU LEAST EXPECT IT!

Research by Japanese scientists has found stress and damage caused by normal walking or running could be a risk factor for developing melanoma on the soles of the feet.

http://cbsn.ws/1Ulvtsp

WHEN IT COMES TO MELANOMA - THINNER IS BETTER!

Screening for skin cancer is essential in saving lives. The risk of dying of the disease is directly related to the thickness  or depth of the melanoma. The longer a malignancy goes unnoticed, the thicker the melanoma grows and greater the risk of dying.

http://bit.ly/1bbuvq1

PREGNANCY AND MELANOMA - IS THERE A LINK?

Melanoma is on the rise in women of child-bearing age and it is especially risky for those who develop the disease during a pregnancy. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic believe pregnancy hormones may be the culprit and actually fuel melanoma.

http://bit.ly/1UzXRZc

http://fxn.ws/1XQoUCq

NEVER LET A DOCTOR TELL YOU THAT YOUR CHILD IS TOO YOUNG TO GET MELANOMA

A 2013 study published in the journal Pediatrics reports the number of diagnosis of melanoma in young people is on the rise by 2% each year in the U.S. It is estimated by The National Cancer Institute that some 500 children in the U.S. will be diagnosed with melanoma each year. Melanoma is also the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults between 15 and 29 years old. A recent study from Johns Hopkins found young people with melanoma have a higher risk of invasive disease than adults.

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111005170737.htm

IT’S NOT ALWAYS ABOUT THE SUN:

When it comes to developing pediatric and adolescent melanoma, UV radiation by way of tanning booths or sun exposure is not always the culprit. Actually, experts believe sun exposure plays a lesser role in development of the disease in young people. Genetics, hormonal changes and other unknown factors are usually the catalyst. And while fair skinned children with light colored hair and freckles are still considered to be at greater risk, it has been documented that children with darker pigmented skin and those with skin that is less sun sensitive are developing melanoma especially under the age of 13.

 

You can learn more by reading this report from The Melanoma Research Foundation:
http://www.melanoma.org/understand-melanoma/pediatric-melanoma

WHY IS MELANOMA MISDIAGNOSED OR OVERLOOKED IN THE YOUNG?

The signs of melanoma in young people are often overlooked as the disease presents very differently from those melanomas seen in adults. Melanomas in children and adolescents tend to be nodular lesions that grow thick, rather than broad in scope. The standard hallmarks of adult melanoma diagnosis, known in medicine as the ABCD’s of detection often do not apply. Thus, the melanomas are often overlooked or misdiagnosed as something as simple as warts, spitz nevi or other non threatening skin conditions.

 

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/pediatric-melanoma-difficult-diagnosis-cases-rise/story?id=19774895&page=2

 

http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com/dermatology-times/news/modernmedicine/modern-medicine-feature-articles/suspected-pediatric-melanomas?page=full

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF ADOLESCENT/PEDIATRIC MELANOMA?

Only a qualified professional who understands pediatric melanoma can make a diagnosis, but immediately have your child evaluated if you observe any of the following signs: (courtesy Melanoma Research Foundation)
• A bump that itches and bleeds
• A spot that looks like an unusual wart – sometimes non-pigmented or with a pinkish color
• An amelanotic lesion – a lump on the skin that isn’t dark or black (like many adult melanomas)
• A mole that becomes nodular – very bumpy and sticking out far from the rest of the skin
• A lesion that presents as a nodule, or lump, especially one that has been rapidly enlarging
• Moles that look strange or large – especially a mole that looks DIFFERENT from your child’s other moles or has more than one color

MELANOMA CAN DEVELOP ANYWHERE

Even under the thumbnails.  Read More:  http://cbsn.ws/1dwaaiw

AN OVERLY AGGRESSIVE FORM OF MELANOMA CAN LOOK AS INNOCENT AS A PIMPLE BUT IS SIX TIMES MORE LIKELY TO KILL IF NOT REMOVED WITHIN TWO MONTHS.